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MARTIAL ARTS HISTORY
The history of the Martial Arts is important to its study.

Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan

Tang Soo Do is not a sport it is a Korean traditional martial art whose history dates back many centuries. Tang Soo Do is renowned its kicking techniques, this is based on the Tang Soo Do style as developed by Grand master Hwang Kee. The founder of Tang Soo Do, Grandmaster Hwang Kee, was a martial arts prodigy, having mastered Tae Kyun (another Korean system not related to Tae Kwon Do) at the age of 22. At that time (1936), he traveled to Northern China where he encountered a Chinese variation of martial art. From 1936 to 1945 he combined
Eastern wisdom and developed what is now known as Tang Soo Do. Tang Soo Do is not a sport. Though it is not essentially competitive, it has great combat applications. As a classical martial art, its purpose is to develop every aspect of the self, in order to create a mature person
who totally integrates his/her intellect, body, emotions, and spirit. This integration helps to create a personwho is free from inner conflict and who can deal with the outside world in a mature, intelligent, forthright, and virtuous manner.

 

Because of the qualities of Tang Soo Do, Grandmaster Hwang Kee established and founded his first Tang Soo Do school under the name “Moo Duk Kwan”. This school developed into a force that has most influenced the martial art styles in modern times. A brief definition of the words “Moo Duk Kwan’ is a “brotherhood and school of stopping inner and outer conflict and developing virtue through Tang Soo Do training.” The Moo
Duk Kwan name gives us direction and philosophy. Tang Soo Do technique requires the mental discipline that Moo Duk Kwan offers. The two combined produce a total development that increases the benefits of both. From their harmony is created an awareness of being that makes Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan training a valuable art form. Since 1957, thousands of Americans have studied Tang Soo Do in Korea. Korean
instructors have been sent around the world, and there are now major Moo Duk Kwan branches worldwide. There are roughly 200,000 Tang Soo Do student sights over 30,000 Dan holders. Anyone who has studied with the grandmaster knows how demanding he is. (He was once heard to say: “If you want to do front and reverse punches correctly, you must spend three hours a day, six days a week for three years doing nothing
else”.)

 

Tai Chi Chuan

Chen Wang Ting began to study and reflect upon his many years of combative experience - already an excellent Martial Artist and knew the 32 postures of another general named Qi Jiguang he was famous for his defensive maneuvers and set forth 32 postures recorded in the well-known "Canon of Boxing".

Chen Wang Ting began to study and reflect upon his many years of combative experience - already an excellent Martial Artist and knew the 32 postures of another general named Qi Jiguang He was famous for his defensive maneuvers and set forth 32 postures recorded in the well-known "Canon of Boxing".


These postures and movements also brought Chen Wang Ting much accomplishment in combat. These 32 postures were re-studied by Chen Wang Ting and incorporated with the philosophy of Tao Teh Ching. He believed that this enhanced and produced a more effective combative application. He also used the ancient Dao Yin exercises and Tuns exercises along with the theory of chi flow through the body. This series of sophisticated movements and unique synthesis became the birth of all Tai Chi styles.


Many people learned of this method and came to Chen Village to learn. At first, the Chen family did not share their knowledge with people on the outside, but eventually taught to promote their beliefs. This progression evolved into new styles of Tai Chi such as: Yang, Wu, Sun and eventually the labeling of the "Original Family Chen Style Tai Chi". The Chen family name, as well as, the Township of Chen became very famous. The Emperor of China bestowed many honors upon the Chen family for their great fighting skills.


Chen style Tai Chi has a large arsenal of technique, strategy and application when it is practiced in the correct way. The postures of Tai Chi are bound by the rule of the movement, which allows movement as a continuous action upon reaction and reaction upon action.


There is no great secret to Tai Chi. One must understand that it is a method that gradually changes the body into a complete working unit.


Chen Style Tai Chi combines many principles of movement along with the cultivation or movement of Chi. Chen Style uses hard, soft, fast and slow movements to create a motion of offensive, as well as, defensive techniques. This is achieved while providing a method of promoting good health, preventing sickness and reducing stress which provides greater potential for quietness.